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Classes, Workshops and Events at Psinergy

Jul
13
Sat
2024
🌓 First Quarter Moon
Jul 13 @ 5:49 pm – Jul 14 @ 12:59 am
Jul
21
Sun
2024
🌕 Full Moon (Buck Moon)
Jul 21 @ 5:17 am – Jul 22 @ 12:59 am
🌕 Full Moon (Buck Moon)

In July, the Full Moon is the Buck Moon, named after the new antlers that emerge from a buck’s forehead around this time of the year. It is also called Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, and (from pagan/medieval times) the Wyrt Moon.

Jul
27
Sat
2024
🌗 Last Quarter Moon
Jul 27 @ 9:51 pm – Jul 28 @ 12:59 am
Jul
28
Sun
2024
Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower
Jul 28 – Jul 29 all-day
Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower

The Delta Aquarid meteor shower, active from July 12 to August 23, is best viewed in the pre-dawn hours, especially around its peak on July 28-29. While the second quarter moon may obscure fainter meteors, find yourself a dark locations after midnight for a better chance to see the brighter ones.

Favoring the Southern Hemisphere and tropical Northern Hemisphere regions like the southern U.S., this shower produces 15 to 20 meteors per hour. Originating from debris left by comets Marsden and Kracht, these meteors radiate near the star Skat in the Aquarius constellation. Unlike many showers, the Delta Aquarids don’t have a sharp peak, instead offering a steady display through late July and early August. During early August, they often coincide with the Perseids, providing an enhanced experience, particularly from southerly latitudes. Got insomnia? You’re in luck! The optimal viewing time is an hour or two before dawn.

Aug
1
Thu
2024
Lughnasadh
Aug 1 all-day
Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh is celebrated near the midpoint of the Summer Solstice and the Autumn Equinox (Northern Hemisphere). It observes the traditional start of the harvest season.

Aug
4
Sun
2024
Mercury Retrograde Begins
Aug 4 all-day
Mercury Retrograde Begins

Time to finish that project you’ve been putting off for years!

Mercury Retrograde is of particular interest to *astrologically* minded folks, and some people who have to deal with communications technology. See URL for more info…

🌑 New Moon
Aug 4 @ 6:13 am – Aug 5 @ 12:59 am
Aug
12
Mon
2024
Perseids Meteor Shower
Aug 12 – Aug 13 all-day
Perseids Meteor Shower

This is one of the best showers of the year, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. This year, a first quarter moon will block the fainter meteors, but it should set shortly after midnight, leaving you with dark skies for the rest of the show. Although the predicted peak falls during the night of August 11-12, it has a long range: from July 14 to September 1. So, you can start watching for these meteors in the early August morning hours. You can also look after the peak in August, after sunset — though the full moon will likely get in the way.

The Perseid meteor shower is perhaps the most beloved meteor shower of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s a rich and steady shower. These fast and bright meteors radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus the Hero. As with all meteor shower radiant points, you don’t need to know Perseus to watch the shower. Instead, the meteors appear in all parts of the sky, frequently leaving persistent trails. Perseid meteors tend to strengthen in number from midnight to the wee hours before dawn.

These meteors are the result of our passing through the tail of Comet Swift-Tuttle. For a while, astronomers calculated that this comet would collide with the Earth during the Perseids in 2126. Such an impact would have spoiled any stargazing since the comet is the largest near-Earth object that periodically passes through our sky. If Swift-Tuttle ever does hit the Earth, its 60 km/s impact will be about 27 times more energetic than the asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs.

🌓 First Quarter Moon
Aug 12 @ 10:19 am – Aug 13 @ 12:59 am
Aug
14
Wed
2024
Mars & Jupiter, Bosom Buddies
Aug 14 all-day
Mars & Jupiter, Bosom Buddies

On August 14, Mars and Jupiter will have a close conjunction, only 0.3 degrees apart, visible in the constellation Taurus. This event is notable for the brightness of the planets and their minimal separation, making it the most prominent conjunction of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, the planets will be observable from around midnight until morning, positioned high in the eastern sky. In the Southern Hemisphere, they will be visible a few hours before sunrise, also in the east.

That said, Mars won’t be very bright. We were spoiled back in 2018 when it was at its closest approach in its 15 year cycle.